State car insurance rates, average car insurance.#Average #car #insurance

State car insurance rates

Average car insurance Average car insurance Average car insurance Average car insurance

Every state has its own car insurance laws, and that means car insurance rates change dramatically across the country. See the average annual car insurance for each state. Click on your state to find out:

  • Average rates by ZIP code
  • Minimum insurance requirements
  • Laws specific to your state
  • Largest car insurance companies in your state

CarInsurance.com commissioned Quadrant Information Services to provide a report of average auto insurance rates for a 2016 Honda Accord for nearly every ZIP code in the United States. We calculated rates using data for up to six large carriers (Allstate, Farmers, GEICO, Nationwide, Progressive and State Farm).

Averages rates are based on full coverage insurance for a married 40-year-old male who commutes 12 miles to work each day, with policy limits of 100/300/100 ($100,000 for injury liability for one person, $300,000 for all injuries and $100,000 for property damage in an accident) and a $500 deductible on collision and comprehensive coverage. The rate includes uninsured motorist coverage. This hypothetical driver has a clean record and good credit. Average rates are for comparative purposes. Your own rate will depend on your personal factors and vehicle.

Nearly everything having to do with car insurance depends heavily on your state. The resources linked below will help you understand specific laws that may or may not affect you.

What is a tort state?: Thirty-eight states use the tort system, which means that someone is found at fault for every accident that involves car insurance, even if the fault is determined to be 50/50 between two drivers.

What is a no-fault state?: Under the no-fault system, car insurance companies pay for certain damages regardless of who was at fault. Laws vary among the 12 states that have no-fault insurance.

No pay, no play states: In states with no pay, no play laws, driving without insurance is even more risky than in other states. Uninsured drivers in these states are not compensated for any damage, even in accidents that are not their fault.

Which states share speeding ticket information?: Many states have formal agreements with each other, such as the Drivers License Compact and the Non-Resident Violator Compact, to share information regarding traffic tickets when drivers are ticketed out of state.





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